Monday, April 15, 2013

Why Read 20 Minutes? Pinterest-Inspired Visual!

 I saw a great visual on Pinterest regarding reading for 20 minutes each night. It came from the Perry & Lecompton Unified School District (click HERE to see the original.) 

I added my own flair to the visual because I plan on adding it to the beginning of the students' planners next year. We all know that it's the fastest way to become a good reader, but there are always those kids (and parents!) who ignore the science and skip reading at night. I think I'll put this on the very first page of the planners in English and Spanish to help get the message across. I might even blow it up and put it in our bathrooms.
We'll see if it helps. If you want the PDF, click here! There's a color and black and white page. I also updated this to have English and Spanish pages as well! :)





If you want to see the original journal article, you can go HERE.

And here's the citation:
Nagy, W. E., R. C. Anderson, and P. A. Herman. 1987. Learning word meanings from context during normal reading. American Educational Research Journal 24: 237–70.

P.S. Check out this cool graphic from OnlineUniversities.com- I think the flipped classrooms idea is interesting for high school teachers. Are there any class flippers out there?


 I'm linking this up at Teaching Blog Addict for Freebie Friday! Join the Party!

36 comments:

  1. Very cool visuals! Thank you for sharing. I'm your newest follower.
    Hunter's Tales from Teaching

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    1. To help make learning to read fun and engaging, our reading program includes lesson stories that are matched to the progress of your child's reading abilities.

      These lessons stories are part of the learning program, and comes with colorful illustrations to make learning reading fun and engaging for you and your child.

      These are the exact same stories and step-by-step lessons that we used to teach our own children to read!

      Find out here: Teach Your Child To Read?

      Best rgs

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  2. I love, love, love the 20 Minutes at Home visual! Thanks for sharing. I just connected to follow you via Google Friend Connect so I'll be back soon!
    Creating Lifelong Learners

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  3. I'm so glad you guys like it! I'm thinking about making this into business card-sized fridge magnets next year to pass out at open house. We'll see how that goes! Thanks for following!

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  4. I really like the "Why Read 20 Minutes..." and would like to print a copy. When I click PDF, a new page comes up, but it's blank. Is there something else I can try to get the page to appear, or to get a copy?
    Thanks! Elaine

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  5. I love this!!! Thank you so much! Do you have it available in Spanish as well? If not, do you have it in another format so that I could have it translated? I would be more than happy to share it back!
    Thanks!!
    moran.melissa@gmail.com

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    1. I just added it in Spanish as well! Enjoy!

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    2. Thank you for sharing!! There are a few errors in the Spanish version, would you be able to send it to me to update, or could I send you text corrections so that you can update the image?
      -Monica

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    3. I sent it! Thanks for the help!

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  6. I used a similar version of this for my first several years of teaching (it was all written out in paragraph form). I always included it in my first parent newsletter and then started including it in the student's notebooks, so it was always there as a reminder. However, about twenty years ago, I transferred the information into a chart similar to yours, and it really made an impact with the parents. I had many parents supporting me and encouraging their child to read every day....even when I didn't assign it for homework!

    I looked at the site you gave and am so glad that I did. I never knew who to give credit to for this incredible information. I knew I had it for a long time, but after seeing the date, I'm wondering if someone passed it to me my first year teaching. I will definitely add the credit to my chart.

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    1. It is awesome! Every teacher who walks into my room asks about this poster. It really affects the students as well. I'm looking forward to sending it home next year. It's a great visual aid!

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  7. I would love to see the Spanish version if you have it!

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  8. This is perfect for students and parents! Is there a way to get a version for my Somali parents/students? Thank you!!!

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  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  10. I'd be happy to help with the Somali translation. Is there an editable version?

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  11. Awesome! Send me your email address and I'll send the .doc version your way! What language will you translate it to?

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  12. Hi I was wondering where you got these pictures and statistics from?
    I would like to use them but I need the sources.
    Thanks!

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    1. Hi there. I updated the post so it would be easier to cite.

      The pictures are just a Webdings font graphic.

      If you want to see the original journal article, you can go HERE:
      http://www.jstor.org/stable/1162893

      And here's the citation:
      Nagy, W. E., R. C. Anderson, and P. A. Herman. 1987. Learning word meanings from context during normal reading. American Educational Research Journal 24: 237–70.

      And here's the original graphic:
      http://www.usd343.net/vnews/display.v/ART/5060992ac7eb2

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  13. Thank you so much for sharing this. I am having a Parent Coffee for my middle school parents on how to motivate their kids to read. I plan on sharing this visual!

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    1. You're welcome! We printed it on the back cover of the students' planners for this school year. It's a powerful visual reminder of the importance of reading at home! I'm so glad I found the original on Pinterest!

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  14. Reading to children, even before they can understand words, teaches them to associate books with love and affection. Read more of our thoughts on our blog: http://bit.ly/19IBkCR

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  15. Muy bueno. Solo un dato: neCeSito <3 :D

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  16. Muy bueno. Solo un dato: neCeSito <3 :D

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  17. Thank you for this. I hope you don't mind, but I'd like to cross-post this on my class blog!!

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  18. Thanks for sharing this! And I agree with Ale from December 13, who says that your Spanish version has a typo. It should read "NECESITO." You have the "s" and "c" reversed.

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  19. Thank you for sharing this. I was looking for this exact information last year for my BTSN presentation.

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  20. Thanks so much for this amazing handout! I'm using it at back to school night for sure! It was very nice of you to include the Spanish translation too.
    Chrissy
    First Grade Found Me

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  21. Hi. We would love to be able to use this on our School's Facebook page. Do we have your permission for this?

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  22. We would love to use this on our school website with your permission.

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  23. A kindergarten teacher would love to post this on her website with your permission.

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  24. Thank you, thank you, thank you for including this in both English AND Spanish!!! I'm a K-12 ESL teacher, and I plan to use this resource at our upcoming parent party to encourage summer reading. Wonderful resource!!

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  25. ya my mom wants to put it on her school website too if that's ok

    sean

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  26. Where can we find the corrected Spanish version?

    Thank you!

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  27. Congratulations on the work, the tables are well organized.

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  28. This is cute and the point is worth making but the arithmetic looks seriously wrong. At 500wpm, Student A would read 1,800,000 words/year (correct in chart), but at the same rate Student B would read 450,000 (not 282,000 words/year) and Student C would read 90,000 (not 8,000 words/year). The math in the footer is also wrong in that Student B would read the equivalent of 15 school days during elementary school (not 12). The point would still be well-made without exaggerating the outcomes. Thanks.

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